B.K. and Mark Sloan are grateful for the tremendous educations their daughters, Kaydee and Elizabeth, received at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Together with B.K.’s parents, Bitsy and Harold Carter, they have created a fund at Southwestern Medical Foundation to support UT Southwestern students through the Sloan Family Scholarship, which benefits second-year students in the School of Health Professions Doctor of Physical Therapy program, as well as funds for a special Women in Medicine orientation reception for first-year female medical students.

Caring for others

Kaydee and Elizabeth Sloan have watched how their parents, B.K. and Mark, have worked hard at whatever they did. “Their work ethic transferred to us,” said Kaydee. “They always stressed the importance of doing your best now to help provide better opportunities in the future. They also instilled in us their deep faith to give back and return the blessings that we have received.”

We wanted to give back to an institution that helped our girls, so we established a scholarship fund. Our hope is that this scholarship continues to help students get the education they need to excel in their careers and make a difference in the world.

Mark Sloan

The sisters are grateful for the unconditional support they received from their parents and have chosen healing professions to care for the people in their communities. In 2014, Kaydee graduated from UT Southwestern as a Doctor of Physical Therapy and works as a staff physical therapist in an outpatient orthopedic clinic. As a DPT, she enjoys educating patients on movement patterns, anatomy, and physiology to help improve the quality of their lives and get them back to activities they enjoy. She believes UTSW does a great job of helping students attain academic knowledge which can transfer smoothly into the clinic environment.

Elizabeth Sloan with sister Kaydee in 2015 at Elizabeth’s graduation.

“Educating both providers and patients is essential to keeping the health of the community moving forward,” she said. “I want to make physical therapy a fun environment for my patients so that it is not a burden to come for treatment. My patients and I spend lots of time together, often over several months, and I enjoy establishing relationships with them and helping them make better decisions for themselves.”

Elizabeth earned her medical degree and completed both a pediatric residency and pediatric rheumatology fellowship at UT Southwestern. In 2021, she joined the UTSW faculty as a pediatric rheumatologist. She is dedicated to her work in diagnosing, treating, and advocating for children with rare autoimmune conditions.

I can’t think of a better mark to make in the world than to make a difference in the lives of children and their families.

Elizabeth Sloan

“The training I received at UTSW really shaped the physician that I am today,” said Elizabeth Sloan. “Coursework for students was rigorous, and I took care of a wide range of patients and had excellent mentors throughout my training. Specifically in our pediatric rheumatology practice, we want to improve access to care and help diagnose and treat children early in their disease course. In addition to patient care, much of our role focuses on increasing awareness both locally and globally, as to what rheumatologists do and how we can best serve patients.”

Elizabeth Sloan (front row, second from right) with her class (Cary College) at a hooding ceremony for graduation.

The Sloan sisters believe it is important to be generous, whether it is through their work, volunteering, or through financial giving.

“Our family’s faith plays a huge role into who we’ve become, and I think that automatically leads into caring for others and helping those in need,” said Kaydee. “We saw our parents live that out, when our mom volunteered at our schools and our dad mentored other young professionals. They made giving and supporting others a consistent part of our lives.”

“Our parents taught us to use our time and skills to benefit people and organizations and to put our hearts behind it,” adds Elizabeth. “When we were younger, I remember stuffing envelopes to raise money and awareness for a children’s hospital and collecting books to create a library for an autism treatment center. We continue this cycle of doing for others because we have been the recipients of such wonderful gifts,” said Elizabeth.

Impacting communities

Mrs. Sloan is grateful for her close family ties and the kindnesses passed down by her parents. “I hit the genetic lottery with my parents, who set the tone for giving. They were very generous, and they paved the way for us to be as generous as we can be, too. Kaydee and Elizabeth are hardworking young women who are carrying on our family’s tradition of helping others. Through their compassionate care they provide healing for families and improve lives. They are mentoring young students and developing research to improve the future of health care. We couldn’t be prouder.”

2021 Scholarship Recipient

Megan Broussard

“It was truly an honor to have received the Sloan Family Scholarship this past year. I was humbled and motivated to continue leading and serving as a student physical therapist and future clinician, not for my sake but for the sake of all those seeking healthcare services.”

Kaydee Sloan at her graduation in 2014.

Mrs. Carter is also inspired by her granddaughters. “Kaydee and Elizabeth have taught us to be more understanding and forgiving, and they have widened our view of life. We are excited to see how far their dreams will take them.”

“It is a nice way to recognize Kaydee and Elizabeth’s hard work through a scholarship fund, and we are glad to support them in that regard,” added Mr. Carter.

“It has been such a joy and privilege to see the Elizabeth Sloan and Kaydee Sloan UTSW Endowment Fund come to life, said Kathleen M. Gibson, President and CEO of Southwestern Medical Foundation.  “Through the experiences of their daughters, the Sloan family became more and more familiar with the needs of students in UT Southwestern’s School of Health Professions and Medical School. Seeing them work as a family to create flexible funding to meet the needs of the students as they emerge over time is remarkable in its insight. Their vision has led to new pathways in welcoming and orienting female medical students to medical school and providing scholarships for outstanding students in physical therapy. The three generations of the Sloan family are truly inspiring examples of leaders not just contributing funding, but also dedicating their careers, to creating the kind of medical community that encourages both talent and leadership to emerge. For their passion and insight, we are forever grateful.”